Potholes: enough is enough, says asphalt specialist

Apr 02, 2013

 

ASI, based in Milton Keynes, says that the current ‘fix and replace’ option preferred by highways authorities is doing little to solve the problem.
 
More than 2.1 million potholes have been filled in the past 12 months at a cost of £112.7 million. Compensation to road users whose vehicles have been damaged by potholes totals a further £55.7 million.
 
The figures are revealed in the annual survey of highways departments in local authorities across England and Wales by the Asphalt Industry Alliance. It aims to assess the state of UK roads and the levels of maintenance activity, as well as the money required to ensure that they are in reasonable condition.
 
ASI marketing manager Pippa Caesar said: “It is common knowledge and this report confirms that the condition of Britain’s roads has deteriorated further. Local authorities are spending more each year fixing potholes and paying out on compensation claims.”
 
ASI provides a range of products for the preservation, recycling, sealing and maintenance of asphalt, macadam and bituminous products. These include the asphalt preservative Rhinophalt and the Rhinopatch pothole repair process.
 
Pippa said: “As road users, as tax payers and as car owners we at ASI would like things to change. As asphalt preservation technologists, ASI advocates an urgent change in the current fix and replace system as it continues to be unsuccessful and expensive.
 
“Along with the general public, we question how much longer local authorities will continue to rely on the current reactive maintenance systems that potentially waste money unnecessarily and a failing road network system that eats away at public support.”
 
Without a new approach, the state of Britian’s roads will continue to deteriorate, she added.
 
“We want to help the highways departments realise that there are more cost-effective and environmentally friendly solutions to maintaining our highways. Without adopting new preservation and maintenance solutions, these figures will continue to get worse, year after year.”
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